Farewell! we must part; we have turned from the land Of our cold-hearted brother, with tyrannous hand, Who assumed all our rights as a favor to grant, And whose smile ever covered the sting of a taunt; Who breathed on the fame he was bound to defend,-- Still the craftiest foe, 'neath the guise of a friend; Who believed that our bosoms would bleed at a touch, Yet could never believe he could goad them too much; Whose conscience affects to be seared with our sin, Yet is plastic to take all its benefits in; The mote in our eye so enormous has grown, That he never perceives there's a beam in his own. O, Jonathan, Jonathan! vassal of pelf, Self-righteous, self-glorious, yes, every inch self, Your loyalty now is all bluster and boast, But was dumb when the foemen invaded our coast. In vain did your country appeal to you then, You coldly refused her your money and men; Your trade interrupted, you slunk from her wars, And preferred British gold to the Stripes and the Stars! Then our generous blood was as water poured forth, And the sons of the South were the shields of the North; Nor our patriot ardor one moment gave o'er, Till the foe you had fed we had driven from the shore! Long years we have suffered opprobrium and wrong, But we clung to your side with affection so strong, That at last, in mere wanton aggression, you broke All the ties of our hearts with one murderous stroke. We are tired of contest for what is our own, We are sick of a strife that could never be done; Thus our love has died out, and its altars are dark, Not Prometheus's self could rekindle the spark. O Jonathan, Jonathan! deadly the sin Of your tigerish thirst for the blood of your kin; And shameful the spirit that gloats over wives And maidens despoiled of their honor and lives! Your palaces rise from the fruits of our toil. Your millions are fed from the wealth of our soil; The balm of our air brings the health to your cheek, And our hearts are aglow with the welcome we speak. O brother! beware how you seek us again, Lest you brand on your forehead the signet of Cain; That blood and that crime on your conscience must sit; We may fall--we may perish--but never submit! The pathway that leads to the Pharisee's door We remember, indeed, but we tread it no more; Preferring to turn, with the Publican's faith, To the path through the valley and shadow of death!

The Break

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Last modified 16-April-2001